Drunk in Public

Finding a good attorney to defendant against drunk in public charges can be difficult. The Law Office of Russell Brown is here to help.


What is Drunk in Public?

You can be charged with being drunk in public if you are in a public place under the influence of intoxicating liquor, or any drug, controlled substance, toluene, in a condition that you are unable to exercise care for your own safety or the safety of others, or you interfere with or obstruct or prevents the free use of any street, sidewalk, or other public way. A “public” place includes bars, restaurants, hotels, and any other places open and accessible to the public.


Penalties for Drunk in Public

Drunk in public (Penal Code Section 647(f)), is punishable by up to six months in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000. The court can also order probation, participation in clean and sober court, attendance at AA meetings, and abstinence from alcohol.

Clean and Sober

Clean and sober court is often required for a conviction of simple possession or under the influence. Restrictions include:

  • No using drugs or alcohol, submit to regular testing;
  • Prohibited from owning any weapons;
  • Submit to search and seizure of property and residence, and random drug testing;
  • No gambling until all probation fees and restitution is paid in full;
  • Do not socialize with drug-using friends or anyone on probation or parole.

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    drunk in public

    Drunk in Public Defenses

    Involuntary Intoxication


    Related Offenses

    Minor in Possession

    If you are under 21, it is a misdemeanor to possess alcohol in public. (Business and Professions Code Section 25662)

    If you are a UCSB or SBCC student, you may qualify for the CASE (College Alcohol and Substance Education) program. If you accepted into the program, all charges will be dismissed upon completion of classes.

    Minor in possession is punishable by a fine of $250 or 24-32 hours of community service. A second conviction is punishable by a maximum fine of $500 or 36-48 hours of community service.

    If you are convicted of a misdemeanor minor in possession, you may also face academic consequences due to your conviction.

    Open Container

    Most counties and cities in California have an ordinance that makes it illegal to have an open container of alcohol in public.

    Russell Brown is a licensed drunk in public lawyer in California.